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31. 01. 2017

WoVBlog

BLOG: How has prize money changed with the FIVB World Grand Prix?

Source: Photo: worldgrandprix.2016.fivb.com

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The FIVB World Grand Prix is the annual competition for women’s volleyball national teams that has been held since 1993. The first competition had 8 teams, but as this was pre-internet, we could not find information on the amount of prize money that was awarded at that time. So, we will start from 1995.

 

In 1995, the San Diego Union-Tribune published that the USA women who won the Final Round received $280,000 for the win and had won $275,000 in Regular Season for a combined total of $550,000 out of total $2 million in prize money (Cleveland Plains Dealer).

Overall prize money dropped in 1996 to $1.5 million and stayed at that level until 1998. In 1999, the FIVB further reduced the prize money to $1 million.

The first year in which we have complete details is 2000. The way that prize money has been distributed has remained similar since that time (prize money awarded has changed). Each Preliminary Round weekend of the World Grand Prix, each four-team pool is playing for prize money. If your team finishes first in the first weekend, second in the second weekend and first in the third weekend, you will be just under the maximum amount that you could win in the Preliminary Round. Then if your team makes the Final Round, your prize money will increase based on your finishing position. Additionally, individual prize money is awarded at the Final Round for best scorer, best blocker, etc.

In 2000, the champion of the Final Round, Cuba was awarded $150,000 for their win, plus with Cuba finishing first in each of the three weekends at $40,000 each. Cuba finished with $270,000 out of $1 million in prize money.

In 2002, the total prize money was the same at $1 million, but prize money for winning the Final Round was increased to $200,000.

The 2003 World Grand Prix was a little different as it was expanded to 12 teams, but only had 1 week for a Preliminary Round, split into two pools of 6. Each team was paid $36,250 to play in the tournament before a match was paid. The pool winner of the Preliminary Round was awarded $50,000, while the Final Round winner was awarded $60,000.

For the 2004 World Grand Prix, the FIVB went back to the three weekend Preliminary Round with each pool winner awarded $35,000 and the Final Round winner $200,000. The total prize money then was $1.35 million (including individual prize money). The FIVB kept total prize money at this level until 2008.

In 2009, the FIVB increased individual prize money to $100,000 from $40,000, which increased total prize money to $1.425 million.

With an expansion to 16 teams in 2011, total prize money was increased to $1.74 million, but the Preliminary Round pool win prize money and Final Round prize money stayed the same.

A further expansion to 20 teams in 2013, Preliminary Round pool win prize money and Final Round prize money stayed the same. Individual prize money was decreased to $50,000 and therefore total prize money was $1.975 million.

When the World Grand Prix broke into three groups in 2014, prize money was reorganized within the different groups. A team winning a four-team pool in their Preliminary Round in Group 1, would win $60,000. While a Group 2 team, $30,000 and a Group 3 team $15,000. Additionally, the Final Round prize money was also broken down by group. The Group 1 champion would be awarded $200,000. While the Group 2 champion $50,000 and Group 3 champion $25,000. In total, including individual awards, prize money was $2.965 million.

In 2015, Group 2 was shifted to two weekends instead of three weekends in the Preliminary Round, which reduced total prize to $2.785 million. This was the same prize money in 2016. With the expansion to 32 teams in 2017, by adding a third pool and a third week to Group 2, total prize money is expected to be at $3.185 million.

The strangest thing is that since 2004, the winner of the Final Round has won $200,000 and it has never changed.

See chart display of Total Team Prize Money for FIVB World Grand Prix by Group and Resulty By Year By Country on the following LINK.

 

Credits: Jeremy Brahm (Inside Volleycountry)

 

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